Class S Criminal
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Male : Fraternal Twin.
Artist. Cosplayer.
Personal mayhem blog.
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See links below for my creations.
*twin excluded*

hannibalsmemorypalace:

omg.. this is the best thing ever, i am dying

NONE OF YOUR FREAKING MOVIES GET IT RIGHT: a guide to Russian names.

silvenhorror:

This post was inspired by years and years of watching movies, series, and fanfics royally and hilariously fuck up the use of names in the Russian language, coming to the point where, if I see another pair of best buddies call each other by full name, I will shoot something, I swear to God.

There are 3 ways people in Russia address each other, and they denote different levels of formality, and the relationship between the speakers. You should know this stuff if you wanna write anything that includes Russian people talking to each other, because if you get it wrong, it will be, alternatively, hilarious or cringe-worthy. I have seen soo much of this in fanfic it’s not funny anymore. So read up y’all!

1. Name + Patronymic.

A patronym, or patronymic, is a component of a surname based on the given name of one’s father, grandfather or an even earlier male ancestor. (thank you, Wikipedia!) A patronymic is not a middle name. Russian people don’t have middle names, period. But we all have patronymics!

Use: formal

Used towards: your teacher, your big boss, a senior citizen with whom you don’t have a close relationship (say, your classmate’s grandma), your doctor, any kind of professor or scholar when you address them formally, a client when you’re in the service industry/work with people (not always, but very often).

Example: Ivan Petrovich, Sergey Vladimirovich, Anna Anatolyevna, Maria Sergeevna, etc

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  • Cashier: *dies at register*
  • Customer: are you open

monobeartheater:

the stars on the american flag are actually asterisks for all the restrictions on the freedom it boasts

Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.

gus fring + character traits